Art-lover leaves New York for stress-free lifestyle

San Antonio’s art communities are helping fuel the city’s current decade of downtown revitalization, a decade witnessing the emergence of The Pearl and modern urban dwellings.  These developments are attracting a wave of young, single executives who are choosing to make their home here. Three years ago, a 30-year-old San Antonio native did just that and relocated her cosmopolitan lifestyle from New York to the Alamo City, this time at The Broadway San Antonio, a high-rise condominium overlooking San Antonio Country Club’s golf course. “I enjoy the tranquil way of life here, where I don’t wake up with anxiety five out of seven days a week,” she says of her new home.

It is no surprise her home resembles an art gallery in some brilliant respects since the homeowner is also involved in the Blue Star Art Center and the San Antonio Museum of Art.  While growing up here, her love and appreciation of art and collecting were inspired by her Mexican-born mother.  “For me, I chose art that is familiar to me. It may remind me of a troublesome point in my life, or it may simply make me laugh through shared humor,” she says about her approach in appointing her stylish home.

In New York she had worked at her uncle’s high-end mid-century furniture gallery, located across the street from the world-famous Gagosian Gallery.  It was here that she became a serious art collector.AtHome1

Living Room, furnished with a Ligne Roset sofa and swivel chairs from Roche Bobois of Houston, is anchored by two Yves Klein glass tables, one featuring Klein-patented blue pigment and the other, gold leaf assembled and installed by Artpace. Lighting up one corner is Stanley Whitney’s contemporary painting.

AtHome3Above top, the study, designed for comfort, is warmed by a rug by artist Didier Marien for Boccara Gallery-Moscow, ordered online from 1st Dibs. The hexagonal light fixture is another online purchase. The sofa by Ligne Roset was custom-made in France, and the table is from NEST in San Antonio.

AtHome2Above, at the condo’s entrance are a neon sign, By Disappointment Only, by Alejandro Diaz of San Antonio and James Riely’s painting of a child.  The artist’s works were represented by the homeowner’s uncle.AtHome4

Hanging above the sofa is a painting by Cuban artist Alexi Torres commissioned by the homeowner. She says, “The piece is a self-portrait. It took months of sending personal mementos to the artist before it was completed and reflects things, at that time in my life, that had a deep personal meaning.” AtHome5On a wall nearby is a work by Rashaad Newsome of New York, a performance and collage artist.  Sol y Luna, a silver and gold sculpture by Mexican artist Pedro Friedeberg, decorates the end table. The rug is Moroccan. At left, the dining room is furnished with table and chairs by Jean Prouve, a French engineer, metalsmith and self-taught arthitect and designer.AtHome6 At top, a painting by Hope Gangloff, an American portrait artist, hangs above the bed in the master bedroom. Adorning another wall is a drawing, V-Day, by San Antonio’s Vincent Valdez, one of the homeowners’ favorite portrait artists.  On the dresser is her collection of Spurs hats.AtHome7Above, the powder room displays photographs by Miles Aldridge the homeowner purchased at the Art Basel in Miami. “Each photograph reminds me of my life while living in New York City.” The painted frames match the main color of each photograph. At right, a painting by California artist James Wolanin hangs above the tub in the master bathroom. 

By Keli Davidson

Photography by Al Rendon